Find It! Scavenger Hunt

Find It! Scavenger Hunt

We have to say that museums aren’t about things—they’re about stories and people.

Having said that, go on a citywide scavenger hunt to find these artful items and learn some of the stories behind them. The objects and places may be different, but you’ll find some universal themes like love, ambition, conflict, and curiosity.

Use the hashtag #MuseumMonthSA on Instagram with any of these items and places to be eligible to win prizes (including memberships and gift cards from the participating organizations!)

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Start by finding a series of tiles scattered throughout the McNay's courtyard that portray scenes from ____________. See if you can spot them all!

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Explore tales of legendary creatures at the Witte, including the Griffin Bones, whose inspiration can be credited to the ____________.

Branch out to the Botanical Garden, where you’ll find the Lucile Halsell Conservatory. Some of the oldest living plants are inside the ____________ Grotto.

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At The DoSeum, immerse yourself in the virtual city of DoLandia to find the hidden flag atop a ____________.

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Move from the virtual world to the underworld at the San Antonio Museum of Art, where this Mummy Mask stares back from the reign of ____________.

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Enjoy the serenity of the gardens at Southwest School of Art and you will find the bronze sculpture called____________by Sandy Scott.

 
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Artpace has been around since 1995, but the building dates to the 1930s. The facility shows many signs of its former function as an _____________ including huge, historic garage doors and a hub cap from one of the cars hanging outside a gallery.

Giddy up! The hunt’s not over yet. At the Briscoe, etched into the stirrups of this ornate saddle are the initials of Mexican General _____________ .

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Here comes the bride (at the Institute of Texan Cultures), all dressed in…black? This dress may seem unconventional now, but it was typically worn during wedding ceremonies in the ____________ culture.

Speaking of the unconventional, the San Antonio Art League and Museum in the King William District is known for its Texas art, so you might be surprised to find this urn from ____________.

It’s a five-minute walk down the street to the Villa Finale. Look for this carved wooden figure of ______________. It opens up to show his life’s accomplishments.

In the neighboring Edward Steves Homestead Museum, be on the lookout for “The Night Watchman.” He’s crafted out of ____________.

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You’ve seen a lot of art by now—time to go hands-on! Follow the river a few blocks to Blue Star Contemporary and get creative in their Art Education Learning Lab. No need to fill in the blank at this step in the hunt—there’s plenty of room to create in their lab.

Wangechi Mutu, This second Dreamer, 2017, Bronze, 5.5 x 15 x 16 in. © Wangechi Mutu, courtesy Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels

Wangechi Mutu, This second Dreamer, 2017, Bronze, 5.5 x 15 x 16 in. © Wangechi Mutu, courtesy Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels

Phew! Have a restful moment at the city’s newest museum, Ruby City, and dream a little dream. This second Dreamer by Wangechi Mutu references ____________’s iconic bronze Sleeping Muse series.

Last but not least, take a walk in the sunshine at Mission Concepción, part of the San Antonio Missions National Park and look inside the convento to find this fresco. Keep your eyes peeled! It’s high on the ____________ .

 
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